Setup TeamSpeak 3 Server On Debian

Asphyxia

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First, I recommend that you have your server running the latest stable Debian.
Use adduser to create yourself a user on the system.
Switch to that account and do this:
X86 // 32-bit architecture
Code:
wget http://dl.4players.de/ts/releases/3.0.11.3/teamspeak3-server_linux-x86-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;tar -zxvf teamspeak3-server_linux-x86-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;rm teamspeak3-server_linux-x86-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;cd teamspeak3-server_linux-x86;./ts3server_startscript.sh start
X64 // 64-bit architecture
Code:
wget http://dl.4players.de/ts/releases/3.0.11.3/teamspeak3-server_linux-amd64-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;tar -zxvf teamspeak3-server_linux-amd64-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;rm teamspeak3-server_linux-amd64-3.0.11.3.tar.gz;cd teamspeak3-server_linux-amd64;./ts3server_startscript.sh start
 
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Asphyxia

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Unless you are running a 32-bit system, which is what people should be running if they are running a TeamSpeak 3 VPS. No reason to have over 2 GB (RAM) for a TS3 server in my opinion. :)
 

Gismo

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Here is a little advice for you.
If u want to see if it is 32 or 64 bit
type:
getconf LONG_BIT
 

dedmen

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Unless you are running a 32-bit system, which is what people should be running if they are running a TeamSpeak 3 VPS. No reason to have over 2 GB (RAM) for a TS3 server in my opinion. :)
64-bit doesnt just mean youre using more than 2gb of ram. 64-bit applications can use x64 cpu instructions and can do some stuff more efficiently on 64-bit cpus And none of the big server hosters in the world uses any 32-bit cpus anymore. But you should know that ^^. SO you should be running 64-bit if you can.
 

Asphyxia

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64-bit doesnt just mean youre using more than 2gb of ram. 64-bit applications can use x64 cpu instructions and can do some stuff more efficiently on 64-bit cpus And none of the big server hosters in the world uses any 32-bit cpus anymore. But you should know that ^^. SO you should be running 64-bit if you can.
If someone is picking a very light VPS with not much RAM at all, I would recommend 32 bit. This poster indicates some good reasons (from stackexchange).

Whether 64-bit is good or bad for performance depends a lot on the application. Generally speaking:

Numerical computations (integer or floating point) are faster in 64 bits, and take about the same amount of memory.
Symbolic computations (manipulating structured data) are slower and can take twice as much memory in 64 bits.
Text manipulation is roughly the same (a little slower and more memory-hungry in 64-bits).
However these are only very rough guidelines, there are a lot of exceptions.

Windows guidelines tend to steer people away from a 64-bit operating system because there are more incompatible applications. Linux was ready for amd64 earlier; the few remaining incompatible applications are mostly closed-source and run fine as 32-bit executables on a 64-bit kernel with the appropriate 32-bit libraries.

On Linux, here are some guidelines:

If you have specific applications that require or would benefit from 64 bits, you need a 64-bit kernel. Note that you can have an amd64 kernel with an ix86 userland, but not the opposite. If these applications don't require many libraries, you could run an amd64 kernel with a 32-bit distribution.
If you need more than 3GB of address space in a single process, it must be 64-bit.
If you have 4GB of RAM or more, get a 64-bit distribution. Linux can use up to 64GB with a 32-bit kernel, but it needs to be PAE-enabled (most distributions include a PAE kernel but it might not be the default one).
If you have less than 1GB of RAM, go 32-bit.
From 1GB to 3GB, go either way, with a slight preference for 64-bit, but perhaps keeping a few applications 32-bit. (For example, I measured more than twice the memory usage with an amd64 binary of Firefox 3.0 than with an ix86 binary of the same version. I haven't repeated the measures for later versions.)
http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/12491

The best way to find out whether to run a TeamSpeak 3 server 64 bit or 32 bit is to benchmark, to monitor how the server performs. I personally think that with limited RAM, 32 bit is the way to go. If I am wrong, then perhaps I do not understand when to apply the use of a 64 bit system. :p
 

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